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Hawker Hunter 48th scale Academy Kit

 
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iwragg
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 12:20 pm    Post subject: Hawker Hunter 48th scale Academy Kit Reply with quote

[/b]
he origins of the Hunter trace back to the Hawker Sea Hawk straight-wing carrier-based fighter. Seeking better performance and fulfilment of the Air Ministry Specification E.38/46, Hawker Aircraft's chief designer Sydney Camm created the Hawker P.1052, which was essentially a Sea Hawk with a 35-degree swept wing. First flying in 1948, the P.1052 demonstrated good performance but did not warrant further development into a production aircraft. As a private venture, Hawker converted the second P.1052 prototype into the Hawker P.1081 with swept tailplanes and revised fuselage, with a single jet exhaust at the rear. First flying on 19 June 1950, the P.1081 was promising enough to draw interest from the Royal Australian Air Force but development went no further and the sole prototype was lost in a crash in 1951.

Meanwhile, in 1946, the Air Ministry issued Specification F.43/46 for a daytime jet-powered interceptor. Camm took the basic P.1052 design and adopted it for the upcoming Rolls-Royce Avon turbojet. The Avon's major advantage over the Rolls-Royce Nene, used in the Sea Hawk, was the axial compressor, which resulted in a much smaller engine diameter and better thrust. In March 1948, the Air Ministry issued Specification F.3/48, to cover development of the project. Initially fitted with a single air intake in the nose and a T-tail, the project rapidly evolved to the more familiar shape. The intakes were moved to the wing roots, to make room for weapons and radar in the nose. A more conventional tail arrangement was devised, as a result of stability concerns. The project number should have been the P.1066, but as it would have undoubtedly been called the "Hawker Hastings" and Handley-Page already had an aircraft with this name, Sydney Camm decided to retire the 1066 project number without it ever being used.

The P.1067 first flew from Mod Boscombe Down on 20 July 1951,[1] powered by a 6,500 lbf (28.91 kN) Avon 103 engine from an English Electric Canberra bomber. The second prototype was fitted with production avionics, armament and a 7,550 lbf (33.58 kN) Avon 107 turbojet. It first flew on 5 May 1952. As a back-up, Hawker was asked to adapt the new fighter to another British axial turbojet. The third prototype with an 8,000 lbf (35.59 kN) Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire 101 flew on 30 November 1952. ]][1] The two Avon-engined aircraft were duck-egg green in color, while the Sapphire prototype was speed silver.

The Ministry of Supply ordered the Hunter into production in March 1950, a year before the first flight. The first production Hunter F 1 with a 7,600 lbf (33.80 kN) Avon 113 turbojet flew on 16 March 1953. The first 20 aircraft were in effect a pre-production series and featured a number of "one-off" modifications, such as blown flaps and area ruled fuselage. On 7 September 1953, a Hawker Hunter F.3 flown by Neville Duke broke the world air speed record, achieving 727.63 mph over Littlehampton [2]. However, the record stood for less than three weeks before being broken by an RAF Supermarine Swift on 25 September 1953.
The Hunter was a conventional all-metal monoplane. The pilot sat on a Martin-Baker 2H or 3H ejector seat. The two seat trainer version used the Mk.4H ejection seats. The fuselage was of monocoque construction, with a removable rear section for engine maintenance. The engine was fed through triangular air intakes in the wing roots and had a single jet pipe in the rear of the fuselage. The mid-mounted wings had a leading edge sweep of 35 degrees and slight anhedral. The tailplanes and fin were also swept. The controls were completely conventional. A single airbrake was fitted under the ventral rear fuselage. The aircraft had conventional retractable tricycle landing gear. A noteworthy feature of the single seat fighter version was the armament of four 30 mm ADEN cannon. The cannon and ammunition boxes were contained in a single pack that could be removed from the aircraft for rapid re-arming and maintenance. Interestingly, the barrels of the cannon remained in the aircraft when the pack was removed. In the two seat version, either a single ADEN Cannon was carried or, in some export versions, two ADEN Cannons, with a removable ammunition tank. A simple Ekco ranging radar was fitted in the nose. Later Marks (Mk's) of Hunter had SNEB Pods fitted. These were 68 mm rockets in 18-round Matra pods, giving a strike capability against road convoys and trains.


A rather nice kit so far, there have been a suggestion on another review to replace the canopy with a vacuum form one. There are some fit issues around the wing roots. I used Tamiya semi gloss black as an under coat, Testors Model Master RAF Sea Grey and Humbrol Sea Green. Under sides are Testors Model Master dull aluminium and Testors metallic sealant and dull coat. Tamiya white putty as a filler and a good pastels to provide weathering.
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iwragg
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:06 am    Post subject: nearing the End Reply with quote


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iwragg
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2008 12:47 pm    Post subject: Completed at last! Reply with quote


At last finished. Quite a good kit and good value for money, the things to watch are as follows:
    Wing fit to fuselage
    Canopy inaccuracy
    Perhaps the pilot seat is too small
    weak under carriage

These things are fixable with aftermarket parts and a little filler. Also shop around for some decals, as the Hunter had a variety of schemes and markings, and you may find some colorful ones among them. Remember to put weight under the cockpit to counter balance the aircraft tail. I used led to achieve this. I used Model master paints, RAF Sea Green, RAF Sea Grey and Dull Aluminum, Test metallic sealant and Dull coat as finishing coats. Artist Pastel was used for the weather and exhaust stains. The canopy was dipped in One Go acrylic polish. The cockpit interior was Tamiya semigloss black, which also was used to undercoat the aircraft. Filler used was Tamiya and Squadron White filler. Weathering was dry brushed on.

Quote:
A good kit, recommend this to all modelers of all experience levels
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iwragg
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:53 am    Post subject: extra Hunter Mk6 diagrams Reply with quote

These are some over Hunter Schemes to consider if you decide to do this model:












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